Has rhetoric in utterance gone mad?


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We all seek to answer “why” too many questions we may ponder about during a quest for truth but to understand “why” we must also understand the answer to this is often times implied by in some sort a “version of truth”.

There is so much angry and hatred out there that sometimes is difficulty to withstand. A person’s tolerances will certainly be put on display at times when faced with this profound utterance of noise.

A prime example would be a dear friend of mine sat at a restaurant/bar with a friend of hers who was leaving the state saying “she was fed up with all the violent, rude and abrasive people she encountered.” This woman went on to express a lot of anger, hatred, and discrimination for several hours while slamming down beers. She expressed hatred towards just about every race, religion and ethnic background; discrimination towards LGBT communities. This friend who sat there to send her angry friend a farewell goodbye without contempt while listening to the hatred and madness received a personal blow to the head too. While as abrasive as this woman was she attacked her friend who came to say farewell with much discrimination and hatred too. This farewell became a colossal mess of angry utterance.

To understand anger one must understand primary and secondary emotions as this example was simply not about what was going on in the world but rather a reflection of how she perceived things to be. Sadly, leaving the state isn’t going to solve her anger because for this to be possible she would first need to run from herself; her emotions.

 

Primary emotions,

Primary emotions are those that we feel first, as a first response to a situation. Thus, if we are threatened, we may feel fear. When we hear of a death, we may feel sadness. They are unthinking, instinctive responses that we have.

Typical primary emotions include fear, anger, sadness and happiness (although it is worth noting that these can also be felt as secondary emotions).

The problem sometimes with primary emotions is that they disappear as fast as they appear. Their replacement by secondary emotions complicates the situation, making it difficult to understand what is really going on.

Secondary emotions,

Secondary emotions appear after primary emotions. They may be caused directly by them, for example where the fear of a threat turns to anger that fuels the body for a fight reaction. They may also come from more complex chains of thinking.

Secondary emotions may be simple feelings or may be a mix as more emotions join the fray. Thus news of a wartime victory may start with feelings of joy, but then get tinged with sadness for the loss of life.

As we begin to explore other emotional oppositions…

The word “Utterance” is also “Rhema” in Greek

Rhema (in Greek) literally means an “utterance” or “thing said” in Greek. It is a word that signifies the action of utterance.

In philosophy, it was used by both Plato and Aristotle to refer to propositions or sentences.

In Christianity, it is used in reference to the concept of Rhematos Christou; Jesus Christ’s sayings.

Utterance in spoken language analysis, an utterance is the smallest unit of speech. It is a continuous piece of speech beginning and ending with a clear pause. In the case of oral languages, it is generally but not always bounded by silence. Utterances do not exist in written language, only their representations do. They can be represented and delineated in written language in many ways.

Utterance may at times mimic sarcasm, lack of filter and blurting out loud; thinking out loud with lack of impulse control or some moral absolute cause one deems fit.

How much does religion factor into emotional and moral entities?

 

Religion and Absolutism…

Moral absolutism is the ethical belief that there are absolute standards against which moral questions can be judged, and that certain actions are right or wrong, regardless of the context of the act. Thus, actions are inherently moral or immoral, regardless of the beliefs and goals of the individual, society or culture that engages in the actions. It holds that morals are inherent in the laws of the universe, the nature of humanity, the will of God or some other fundamental source.

It is the opposite of Moral Relativism, the position that moral propositions do not reflect objective and/or universal moral truths, but instead make claims relative to social, cultural, historical or personal circumstances. It is related to, but not the same as, Moral Realism (the position that certain acts are objectively right or wrong, independent of human opinion), and to Moral Universalism (the position that there is a universal ethic which applies to all people, regardless of culture, race, sex, religion, nationality, sexuality or other distinguishing feature).

Many religions have morally absolutist positions, and regard their system of morality as having been set by a divinity or Supreme Being, and therefore absolute, perfect and unchangeable. Many Christians regard Christian theology as teaching a hierarchy of moral absolutes known as graded absolutism, where in the case of a conflict between two absolutes, the duty to obey the higher one (God) exempts one from the duty to the lower ones (fellow humans or, still lower, property). Divine Command Theory is an absolutist meta-ethical theory that an act is obligatory if it is commanded by God.

A primary criticism of Moral Absolutism regards how we come to know what the absolute morals are. For morals to be truly absolute they would have to have a universally unquestioned source, interpretation and authority, which critics claim, is impossibility. Why else would there over a thousand different versions of truth to these morality and books of in similar relativity of supreme beings? Of the more obvious criticisms is the sheer diversity of moral opinions which exists between societies (and even within societies) in the world today, which suggests that there cannot be a single true morality.

In versions of truth, psychiatry is just scratching the surface to understand how much scrupulosity may factor into religion, emotional and moral entities. Scrupulosity is categorized as an anxiety; OCD condition in which fear may factor into absolutism. Given the fears within scrupulosity there isn’t an accurate consensus or data to estimate how much this factors into society.

 

Let’s build a foundation to a better future together

 

Quote by Malcolm X,

“One of the first things I think young people, especially nowadays, should learn is how to see for yourself and listen for yourself and think for yourself. Then you can come to an intelligent decision for yourself. If you form the habit of going by what you hear others say about someone, or going by what others think about someone, instead of searching that thing out for yourself and seeing for yourself, you will be walking west when you think you’re going east, and you will be walking east when you think you’re going west.”

We are often a product of our past generations through moral absolutism, but I think it’s time to reshape our own intuitive thoughts; take a stance and lead just as many other great, inspiring leaders. Redefine the person you were born to be, lead examples with positive interactions of intolerance because violence begets violence; hatred begets hatred. We need to set better examples for future generations ahead.

Forgiveness versus Acceptance Part 4; Devine Intervention 


I carry value in philosophy when it comes to motivation and setting goals. I am a freelance writer, motivational life coach within the community. My work extends into social media networking and barriers that sometimes keeps a person stuck pondering endlessly from time-to time. Mindfulness has become a way of life for me and I share my experiences with those whom seek to find a meaningful balance in life. Finding ways to cope with life stressors, as well, to think outside the box. To place understanding into a different perspectives when hindered by ones own fleeting thought process or collective barriers beyond interpersonal communication. To better understand OCD and other mental health factors one may find difficult to understand. To define meaning into the theory of all things that may place ones thought process into state doubts; questions one may desire to find and/or at times embrace their own burden of truths. For one to find willingness to know that sometimes thoughts serve no other purpose than to simply be fleeting and/or thoughts that do not warrant an emotional response. To allow ones thoughts to freely pass and stay in the present moment.

Lets take a walk into the world of mindfulness…

This video is a two-part series to Arts & Eating Disorders in partnership with The Emily Program Foundation & The International OCD Foundation on separate occurrences from 2015 through 2017.

As time went by I added a video to contribute to the poem read on the video that was made though donations for The Emily Program Foundation.

However this documentary address other coexisting psychological condition referenced towards OCD & Eating Disorders. One that proved to be quite challenging to overcome. I walked a path for years on fears alone and I can say with certainty that this proved to be a powerful source. After all fear can be quite a motivating factor and relentless at the very least. Not to long I submitted an article to The International OCD Foundation and received a welcoming response of acceptance. The article is based on living with OCD and tools I’ve learned throughout the years to maintain a healthier quality of life.

The article,

“OCD; Trapped in compulsive modes, wrapped within unwanted thoughts and fearsome images”

By Marsha Beede

Is it possible for the unimaginable to happen to you? Where one day you wake from a deep cloud, a decade later, only to find life has passed you by? An unhealthy sense of fears, shame and guilt that was never yours to own, but rather you may have carried sorrows, regrets and pains of others that became so deep that fears and images lay within you and depleted every effort you made?

This can happen too many and it did happen to me…

Story of survival can be found at https://iocdf.org on their 2017 Summer Newsletter.

Spiritual Path in Distress”

When it comes to human behavior, actions in regards as to how a person responds to a crisis mode in their lives may at times mimic a cluster of personal distress of destruction. A crisis can condition a person to stray far from stabilization in any manner within actions. This doesn’t necessarily change or modify a person’s  elevated state of being but rather dysfunction may occur.

Quote:

It is often said when it comes to addictions, mental illness, one may survive at a bare minimal in times of struggles. One’s ability to maintain a faction of hope strays far, just enough to keep a person on solid ground; living moment-by-moment in any given circumstances where there are shadows of doubts…

If you know of a love one whom may be struggling with mental health seek help through a mental health professional or call a crisis hotline in your area because it’s never too late.

“Change starts with ones action; to become unglued and resilient to change on ones perspective views towards a better quality of life”

Marsha Beede

 

Forgiveness versus Acceptance Part 3; Catalyst of Unhealthy Guilt


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“Catalyst of Unhealthy Guilt”

 

It is often said that forgiveness is a healing process, healing within itself is for those who seek it. Forgiveness can be the ultimate sacrifice one does to alleviate pains of sorrow. A sorrow so deep at times it can feel unbearable until one can release this pain.

Then there is another kind of forgiveness that we sometimes seek that can drive a wedge between those we love. The “unhealthy guilt” , sometimes called “Irrational guilt” where it’s not ones to own. Where we mistakenly take on other people’s guilt because the pain can feel horrendous. Pain that can be misplaced where one can only assume this to be true if we didn’t recognize the difference.

[In other terms this can be best described as “Irrational guilt” that leads to “doubts about oneself” and “irrational shame” that is displaced. Hallmark features for anxiety and OCD.]

When we don’t know the difference between healthy forgiveness versus unhealthy or irrational guilt we may unintentionally place a wedge between those we love and drive them away.

The catalyst of unhealthy guilt; the straw that broke the camel’s back…

Before we go further one must ask themselves,

·         Why am I seeking forgiveness?

·         What do I wish to gain when asking for forgiveness?

·         What action do I wish to receive from someone else in return?

·         When does asking for forgiveness become too much?

 

The healing of our own emotions can only be done through first healing ourselves. This is especially true if you have carried the burdens of unhealthy guilt. But many similar emotions we feel can lead to unhealthy guilt if one suffers from grief or loss, anxiety, depression, etc. But grieving a loss does not necessarily mean the death of a love one. There are many factors in life where one may grieve and most often related to unresolved emotions steaming from circumstances beyond control. Where we feel this lack of control in our lives may become the hindering addictions we seek externally.

Like any addiction, unhealthy guilt can feed into the notion that what we are feeling or what we might be saying to ourselves must be true. The catalyst of an unhealthy guilt can lead to years of chaos in our lives if we do not seek the underline source of our emotions. Unhealthy guilt leads like an addiction and spreads like wildfire through the trees and plains that have become out of control.

 

Perhaps there were times one found themselves apologizing over-and-over asking for forgiveness believing past circumstances warranted this to be factual right down to the core of one’s conscience state of mind.

My proposed question is to ask “What if there is nothing to forgive?”

In many stages of forgiveness or however one convinces themselves at times by being repetitive in nature to sorrows, it often may drive opposite action upon others we are seeking forgiveness. Perhaps one may become consumed by the “what ifs” in thoughts of sorrows with unhealthy guilt and self-doubts. This combo is like mixing magnesium sulfate and carbonated beverages. Sooner or later it will fester and explode. This course of actions does more harm than good.

Most importantly, sometimes thoughts serve no other purpose than to simply be thoughts.

There comes a time in a person life that one may need to reexamine the situation and ask themselves “why is it that I feel so compelled to seek forgiveness?” Perhaps unhealthy guilt could be the culprit of another’s wrong doing. People generally don’t like to live in past tense and at times this pattern of behavior can hinder one’s ability to move forward into a healthier state of mind. At times communication barriers have taken a toll on others we seek forgiveness. To a sense where one asking for forgiveness hasn’t grasp another’s forgiveness to them.

Is it possible for one to misinterpret such compelling words by repeating the same thing to such great overabundance?

Absolutely, this can happen for several different reasons. Communication can drive a wedge when we misunderstand things. Perhaps someone had said forgiveness isn’t necessary because they felt there wasn’t anything to forgive. At times repeating and saying “its fine or everything is ok overwhelmingly to where a person becomes pressured to reassure another’s pattern of behaviors. This can drive a person away like salt on open wounds; the instability of irrational guilt’s, leaving feelings of hopeless about situations. This kind of repetitive behavior often creates problems by stirring up emotions that may have never been there to begin with.

However just like many addictions unhealthy guilt can become an unhealthy behavior. There have been many discoveries through science and psychology, how the pathways to our brains can change when we change our actions. This is especially true to changing behaviors. Like any addiction or habit the changes start within us. Many addictions and mental health situations are not circumstantial, nor do them fade by the changes we make within ourselves but rather things may become much more manageable as time passes. But only through time can we see these changes as they accrue. Most often great changes can take years to accomplish as we begin recognize what it is we are trying to change. The same is true for unhealthy guilt.

You cannot make up for lost time, nor can a person change what has already been done. We cannot own or accept other people’s faults, nor can we change others wrong doings. The only thing we have in our lives where we can maintain control of circumstance is the control we have within ourselves. Our own emotions, thoughts and our own actions will lead us down a path of choices. It’s that choice we make now, currently in plain view that we may come to embrace towards our future. Like any kind of addiction this too, unhealthy guilt comes with emotional pain when we choose to let go. Because with any uncertainty there is fear and fear can be a powerful motivator.

After all time doesn’t stand still for anyone and neither should you. What we can do is seek a brighter future, take leaps of faith and drive it towards more positive outcomes. When we learn to let go unhealthy and irrational guilt, the chain may become undone and one may no longer be hindered by the inability to move forward but rather gain insight.

 

Marsha Beede

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Inspired By Je_Mar Designs


 

[Creative innovative ideas in multimedia and marketing strategies come with a creative edge that can be seen not only virtually, but also through illustration within ones imagination. We’re a…

Source: Inspired By Je_Mar Designs

“The Rarest Of Truths”


Source: “The Rarest Of Truths”